Teachers reflection

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Identification
Level of process: 
Method
Intent or purpose: 
To be able to appreciate the positive and negative aspects of those who influenced our lives and to raise the question of how to become a more effective teacher.
Used as component of: 
this can be used as an opening for a Training of Trainers course or a way of reflecting on the influences on our lives.
Types of Participants: 
any
Recommended size of group: 
11-25
Optimal amount of time needed: 
45 - 6 min.
Howto
Usual or Expected Outcomes: 
Reflection on the roles our teachers have had on our lives.
Level of participation: 
high
Ideal Conditions: 
relaxed infomral atmosphere.
Potential Pitfalls: 
People not wanting to share personal stories
How is success evaluated: 
When this really works well there is a sense that something profound happened.
Type of Facilitator-Client Relationship: 
This requires some experience to actually pull off
Level of Difficulty to Facilitate: 
Facilitation skills required
Facilitator Personality Fit: 
Any is willing to take risks and share quite personal stories about their relationships with their teachers.
Setting and Materials: 
any
Resources Needed: 
none
Pre-Work Required: 
The facilitator needs to think through the stories they are going to use. The stories need to be accessable to the participants - something that they can identify with.
Procedures: 

<b>Context</b><br>
1. What are the qualities of a good teacher? What makes some teachers masters, not of knowledge but of getting people to learn?
<br><br>
<b>Steps</b><br>
1. Teaching is more than give good lectures. When have you been deeply effected by a teacher? <i>(Tell a story of a teacher that deeply effected you. For example, I had an English teacher in University who insisted on treating me as his friend. We shared ideas and insights. I think I was more a colleague than a student.)-</i> I don't think I will ever forget Dr. Commachero. What teacher has deeply effected you?<br>
2. Some teachers seem to find ways for you to do more than you think you can. <i>(Tell story of this kind of teacher. For example, I had a teacher in high school that taught mathematics. He was the first teacher I remember encouraging me to learn on my own. He gave me a book on conic sections, well outside the curriculum or even high school level. He believed that I could understand enough to learn from it.)-</i< Who, for you, was a teacher that encouraged you beyond what was required?<br>
3. Sometimes a teacher knows you better than you know yourself. <i>(Tell another story. I remember another English teacher who insisted on students doing their best. One time I turned in a paper, the next day she handed it back, and said, "You can do better than this. Return it when it is as good as you can make it.)-</i> When has a teacher required more than you thought you could give?<br>
4. Most teachers are not teachers but something else. <i>(When I was in junior high school, I went to the cafe in my village. The owner taught me to play chess. Every day after school, I went to the cafe and I would watch him play. Sometimes he would let me play with him. He was a great teacher.)-</i> When have you learned from someone that was not a teacher?<br>
5. What are the qualities of a good teacher?<br>
6. What is one practical thing you could do to become a better teacher?<br>
<br>
<b>Closing</b><br>
1. I believe that great teachers are constant learners.<br>
2. Make announcements.

How flexible is the process?: 
very, a number of topics can be used and different stories adapted to the ausience
Follow-Up Required: 
None
Background
Developer: 
Jon Jenkins
Derived from: 
This is a combination of the Basic Conversation Method and what was called Spirit Conversations by the Institute of Cultural Affairs.
History of Development: 

This particular conversation was developed as a part of a Training of Trainers Course.

References: 
Spencer, L. (1989). Winning Through Participation, Dubuque: Kendall/Hunt Publishing.<br> Stanfield, B., Ed. (1997). The Art of Focused Conversation, Toronto: The Canadian Institute of Cultural Affairs. <br> Wilson, P. H., Harnish, K. & Wright, J. (2003). The Facilitative Way, TeamTech Press, Shawnee Mission, KS.
License Model: 
Free (or unattributable)
Suppliers
Creators: 
Namesort descending City Country
Imaginal Training Groningen Netherlands
Trainers: 
Namesort descending City Country
Imaginal Training Groningen Netherlands
Consultants: 
Namesort descending City Country
Imaginal Training Groningen Netherlands
Online: 
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