Fishbone Analysis

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Identification
Alternative names: 
Ishikawa diagram; root cause analysis
Level of process: 
Application
Method
Method category: 
Intent or purpose: 
To study a problem/issue to determine the root cause. To analyse the possible reasons why a process is beginning to have difficulties, problems, or breakdowns. To identify areas for additional research. To experience the capacity to find the root causes of a problem.
Used as component of: 
A planning process
Recommended size of group: 
6-15
Optimal amount of time needed: 
3 hours
Howto
Usual or Expected Outcomes: 
A list of the most likely and the most probable cause.
Level of participation: 
high
Type of Facilitator-Client Relationship: 
High trust needed
Level of Difficulty to Facilitate: 
Facilitation skills required
Setting and Materials: 
Fish Diagram on large white board or seveal flipchart taped to gether.
Resources Needed: 
markers, flipchart and white board
Pre-Work Required: 
Prepare blank fish diagram
Procedures: 

<p><i><b> Background</b></i><</p>
<p>Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa, a Japanese quality control statistician, invented the fishbone diagram. It is some times called Ishikawa diagram. The fishbone diagram is tool to systematically look at an issue and the causes that contribute to those issues. The design of the diagram looks much like the skeleton of a fish. Therefore, it is often referred to as the fishbone diagram. See the diagram page.</p>
<i><b>Steps</i></b><br>
<p>1. Draw the fishbone diagram on a large white board of several flipcharts taped together.<br>
2.Agree on the focus question / issue.
<br>3. Write the problem/issue to be worked on in the "head of the fish". <br>
4. Brainstorm issues that ?cause? the issue.<br>
5. Organize them into 6 to 12 categories.<br>
6. Label each ""bone" of the "fish".<br>
7. For each of the categories create subcategories and put them on the smaller bones of the fish.<br>
8. To generate more and deeper insights into the causes ask, ?Why is this happening??<br>
9. Continue until no more useful information is coming out.<br>
10. When an adequate amount of detail is in each of the major categories, look for items that show up in more than one category. These are ?most likely causes?<br>
11. Prioritize them. The first is the most probable cause.<br>
12. Go to the solution stage.<br><br>
<b><i>Refledction</i></b><br>
1. What were the stages of this exercise?<br>
2. What were you surprised by?
3. What did you learn?<br>
4. What will it take to make this useful for the company?</br></p>

How flexible is the process?: 
very
Follow-Up Required: 
problem solution generation process normally follows this.
File attachments: 
AttachmentSize
Microsoft Office document icon fishbone.doc46.5 KB
Background
Developer: 
Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa
Derived from: 
unknown
Epistemological Framework: 
unknown
History of Development: 

unknown

Selected publications: 
0787977292
References: 
The idea was suggested by Mitch Owen Mitch_Owen@ncsu.edu on the GRP FACL Listserve. http://www.albany.edu/cpr/gf <br> Bens, Ingrid: Facilitating with Ease, Participative Dynamics, 1997, p. 159
License Model: 
Free (or unattributable)
Suppliers
Creators: 
Trainers: 
Namesort descending City Country
Creative Human Relations Solutions Fayetteville United States
CRIAVIVA Consultoria Sao Paulo Brazil
Imaginal Training Groningen Netherlands
mind@work Den Haag Netherlands
worksmarts Tuckahoe United States
Consultants: 
Namesort descending City Country
Creative Human Relations Solutions Fayetteville United States
CRIAVIVA Consultoria Sao Paulo Brazil
Imaginal Training Groningen Netherlands
Making Space Consulting East Lyme United States
mind@work Den Haag Netherlands
worksmarts Tuckahoe United States
Online: 
Supporters: