Analogy Brainstorm

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Identification
Alternative names: 
Metaphors for ideas
Level of process: 
Method
Method category: 
Intent or purpose: 
To use analogies as a basis of generating ideas
Used as component of: 
Part of a workshop to break loose the thinking of the group. This can be used as an intervention when the group needs a boost when brainstorming.
Types of Participants: 
They need to be a little playful
Optimal amount of time needed: 
3 - 6 min.
Howto
Usual or Expected Outcomes: 
a list of ideas that are quite divergent from each other
Level of participation: 
high
Ideal Conditions: 
The group has a high need to generate creative ideas
Potential Pitfalls: 
It can fail if the group is not willing to take a few risks.
How is success evaluated: 
Divergent ideas
Type of Facilitator-Client Relationship: 
There needs to be a high level of trust.
Level of Difficulty to Facilitate: 
Facilitation skills required
Facilitator Personality Fit: 
Able to be playful
Setting and Materials: 
any
Resources Needed: 
none
Pre-Work Required: 
Think through possible analogies to use in the brainstorm
Procedures: 

1. State the focus question clearly and check to see that the participants understand it.

2. Divide the group into sub-groups

3. Assign each sub-group an analogy to brainstorm from. Examples of analogies are

--- a) A famous peope Carly Fiorina of HP, Steve Jobs of Apple, Mahatma Gandhi or Bill Gates of Microsoft.

--- b) How would nature deal with the issue such as ants, weather, or an ecosystem?

--- c) How would an other type of organization deal with the issue such as a monistary, the Mafia, a University, the military, etc.?

4. Give the groups time to brainstorm.

5. Have them report.

How flexible is the process?: 
very
Follow-Up Required: 
A convergent exercise to process the ideas.
Background
Developer: 
unknown
Derived from: 
Found in Jo Nelson's "Meeting Tools"
History of Development: 

unknown

Selected publications: 
0865713472
References: 
Kaner, Sam with Lenny Lind, Catherine Toldi, Sarah Fisk and Duane Berger: Facilitator?s Guide to Participatory Decision-Making, New Society Press, 1996, p. 163.
License Model: 
Open
Suppliers
Creators: 
Trainers: 
Namesort descending City Country
CFI Syllab Inc. Montreal Canada
Creative Human Relations Solutions Fayetteville United States
Imaginal Training Groningen Netherlands
Learning Matters Singapore Singapore
Consultants: 
Namesort descending City Country
CFI Syllab Inc. Montreal Canada
Creative Human Relations Solutions Fayetteville United States
Imaginal Training Groningen Netherlands
Learning Matters Singapore Singapore
WebIQ Silver Spring, Maryland United States
Online: 
Supporters: 
Namesort descending City Country
Imaginal Training Groningen Netherlands