The Greeting Game

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Identification
Alternative names: 
Level of process: 
Method
Delivery: 
Intent or purpose: 
To enable participants to loosen up with one another with humorous greetings.
Types of Participants: 
Recommended size of group: 
1-10
11-25
26-50
unknown
Optimal amount of time needed: 
20 minutes
Howto
Usual or Expected Outcomes: 
Level of participation: 
Ideal Conditions: 
The room needs to be large enough for participants to mill about a bit
Potential Pitfalls: 
How is success evaluated: 
Examples of successes and failures: 
Type of Facilitator-Client Relationship: 
Level of Difficulty to Facilitate: 
No specific skills required
Facilitator Personality Fit: 
Facilitator can't take him or herself too seriously
Setting and Materials: 
Resources Needed: 
Pre-Work Required: 
Invent a series of ways for your participants to introduce themselves to one another, such as: • Greet one another as nerds • Greet one another as hula dancers • Greet one another as childhood friends • Greet one another as ex-lovers • Greet one another as cavemen • Greet one another as cats • Greet one another as rock stars. • Greet one another as sumo wrestlers • Greet one another as royalty • Greet one another as dolphins • Greet one another as celebrity chefs • Greet one another as bikers • Greet one another as The Next Top Model contestants • Greet one another as (various functions in the organization with which you’re working, such as Salespeople, HR, Purchasing, Design and Development, etc.)
Procedures: 

1. Have the group mill about in the room. Explain to the group that they will have 3 minutes to greet the first person they come to after the way of greeting is announced.

2. You, the facilitator, are the “caller”. Call out every 3 minutes a new way in which people should greet one another. After each greeting round, have participants mill about again to find another partner to greet.

How flexible is the process?: 
Follow-Up Required: 
Background
Developer: 
Matthew Milo eHow.com
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